Sacagawea Dollars

Discussion in 'Coin and Bullion Reviews' started by pcunix, Apr 5, 2014.

  1. pcunix

    pcunix Guest

    Sacagawea Dollars began in 2000 and are still made today, although few circulate. I have had them in change now and then, but rarely - probably some kid spent a birthday present and the store got rid of it as fast as they could.

    There's probably good reason for the dislike. It's an attractive coin. but people confused them with quarters, in spite of the coloring. There seems to be a curse on dollars: they are either too big or they are confusing.


    2004-S SAC OBV.jpg 2004-S SAC REV.jpg

    But that's not the whole of it. Although a dollar doesn't buy much today, it still buys enough that (if we are carrying cash at all), we may have a few in our wallets. I just checked my wallet - I have 18 singles. I would NOT want to carry around 18 dollar coins in my pocket. If I got anything near 18 coins of any denomination, I'd throw the excess into our "coin jar" and eventually take it to a coin machine. But the problem with dollar coins is that they have too much value - I wouldn't like throwing ten of them into the coin jar. That's likely the bigger reason dollar coins don't circulate.

    By the way, should you happen upon a Sacagawea Dollar from 2000 with a "P" mintmark, it could be very worth your while to flip it over to look at the back because there are two varieties that year that do have high value.

    The lesser is the "Wounded Eagle" variety, which has a distinctive mark on the eagle's breast. I say "lesser", but uncirculated examples are worth at least a few hundred dollars and in more perfect condition, much, much more.

    The king (queen?) of the Sacagawea's is the so called "Cheerios" coins, so called because many of these were packed in Cheerio's boxes. Nobody knows for sure how many were put into those boxes, but only a few dozen are known to exist. There may be as many as 5,500 (that's how many boxes Cheerio's packed) but of course many were spent (and now sit in vaults somewhere) and who knows how many were simply not noticed and thrown away. Some may have been thrown away out of ignorance - the coin was brand new then and some people may have thought it was just a cheap token with no value at all!

    There is yet another version that is even more rare.

    Only one is known, and you aren't likely to find another. It has the coloring and the reverse of the Sacagawea Dollar, but the obverse is that of a State Quarter. I'd guess somebody made that and snuck that out of the mint unofficially.

    See http://coins.about.com/library/US-c...0-Sacagawea-Native-American-Values-Prices.htm

    Later, the reverse design changed. Should you happen to find a 2009 to 2011 date, look on the edge - there should be strong edge lettering. If it is weak, partial or missing entirely, that's a more valuable coin.

    There are several other possible reverses for Sacagawea Dollars - some people collect all of them.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 5, 2014
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  2. Jeffkon5

    Jeffkon5 Well-Known Member

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    That was very informative! I'm gonna have to check mine today.
     
  3. ken454

    ken454 Founding Member

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    i've always checked mine, and i also buy all the ones in the tellers trays every time i visit the bank...
     
  4. BryanB

    BryanB Well-Known Member

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    Good info. I just have the 2000 D.
     
  5. pcunix

    pcunix Guest

    I know I have some circs around here somewhere, but as usual I can't find them!
     
  6. Nathan F.

    Nathan F. Guest

    Now I have to go pluck these out of my change jar and give them a once over :)
     
  7. pcunix

    pcunix Guest

    I can't find mine. Lost in our move, I guess. Oh well.
     
  8. DSalyer

    DSalyer Well-Known Member

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    The mint also wanted to strike collector versions of the coin out of gold. They struck some before Congress said they did not have the authority to do so! I think there are around 20 or so that exist. They took a trip on the space shuttle and now sit out-of-sight in Fort Knox.
     
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  9. pcunix

    pcunix Guest

    Something I did not know, thanks!
     
  10. DSalyer

    DSalyer Well-Known Member

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    I reseached this further and found that they struck the gold version in a $5 denomination and a $1 denomination with a W mint mark. It sounds like all of the $5 and all but 12 of the $1 coins were destroyed. The remaining 12 were sent into space and are now in Fort Knox. Since then they have been put on display only once before being returned to storage.
     
  11. pcunix

    pcunix Guest

    I wonder why keep 12? If the thought is to prevent irreplaceable loss, then why keep them in one place? And why keep any at all, for that matter?
     
  12. DSalyer

    DSalyer Well-Known Member

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    I totally agree. The gold $1 coins were made to commemorate the Space Shuttle. I guess since they flew in space they have a historic value but I am not sure why they must be hidden away from the public view.
     
  13. pcunix

    pcunix Guest

    I guess we the public aren't privileged enough. Maybe if we could afford to finance a few campaigns we could get to see them.

    And in this day of ubiquitous internet, why not display national treasure on line?
     
  14. DSalyer

    DSalyer Well-Known Member

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    Also, the designer of the obverse, Glenna Goodacre opted to receive her $5,000 reward in Sacagawea dollars. She later had them certified and slabbed by ICG. During the certification process it was discovered that some of the dollars she received had a different proof like finish. These were called presentation dollars and sell for a premium as well.
     
  15. pcunix

    pcunix Guest

    I didn't know about those either. I see they sell for a good price on ebay - I guess she did well with that decision!
     
  16. DSalyer

    DSalyer Well-Known Member

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    I would say she did very well. She was bound to increase the value of each of the dollar coins just by slabbing and giving them a pedigree. The fact that some turned out to have a special finish really increased her profits!
     

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